It might be the vacation but we’re still here!

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With 24/7 access to The Murray Library over the Spring Vacation there is no excuse not to finish off that dissertation or make an early start on your revision. We’re even offering non-staffed hours on the bank holidays so make the most of your library this vacation. Fit in a few hours work this vacation and you can definitely treat yourself to a chocolate egg or three. 

For full details of opening hours at The Murray and St. Peters, visit the Library Website.

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(Source: uoslibperformingarts)

On April 8th 2014 there will be a change to the way you log in to the Library Catalogue. Instead of entering the barcode from your Campus Card you simply use your own University User ID and password helping us improve security, and giving you access to more information from within My Account.
 You will now be able to view all the notifications we send you by email  including pre-overdue, overdue and reservation notices.

On April 8th 2014 there will be a change to the way you log in to the Library Catalogue. Instead of entering the barcode from your Campus Card you simply use your own University User ID and password helping us improve security, and giving you access to more information from within My Account.

You will now be able to view all the notifications we send you by email  including pre-overdue, overdue and reservation notices.

3D Printing: new resources to support you

Lipson, H. and Kurman, M. (2012) Fabricated: the new world of 3D printing. Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley.
Hoskins, S. (2013) 3D printing for artists, designers and makers.London: Bloomsbury.
Make Ultimate Guide to 3D Printing Sebastopol: O’Reilly Media.
versocovers:

Frédéric Lordon, The Willing Slaves of Capital. Design by Michael Oswell.
Verso hired me to commission designers such as Michael to design books such as this, which asks: “Why do people work for other people?” The cover is a grotesque parody of a business self-help book, speckled with metallic silver excess. It’s wonderful. 

Verso Covers is a great blog to follow, maintained by Art Director Andy Pressman.

versocovers:

Frédéric Lordon, The Willing Slaves of Capital. Design by Michael Oswell.

Verso hired me to commission designers such as Michael to design books such as this, which asks: “Why do people work for other people?” The cover is a grotesque parody of a business self-help book, speckled with metallic silver excess. It’s wonderful. 

Verso Covers is a great blog to follow, maintained by Art Director Andy Pressman.

Tags: design books

National Glass Centre joins Museums at Night

It’s great to see that National Glass Centre is joining Museums at Night this year, along with Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens.

Held annually, this year museums and galleries across the country will be open into the night from Thursday 15th - Saturday 17th May, with special events, activities and exhibitions on offer in many places.

National Glass Centre will be holding a free family fun day which will also launch the summer exhibition.

Watch out for more blog posts about Museums at Night, highlighting what’s going on in the region.

The Zandra Rhodes Digital Study Collection provides unique online access to images of 500 of the designer’s iconic dresses and garments, for use in learning, teaching, and research internationally, by fashion historians, fashion and textile designers, and fans of Zandra Rhodes’s work alike. These were selected out of thousands of couture pieces designed by Zandra Rhodes, which are held in her private archive at her fashion studio in London. The digitised garments cover her entire creative career from the late 1960s to the present day, with particular focus on her landmark collections of the 1970s and 1980s.

Explore the Zandra Rhodes Digital Study Collection

Kate Adie to speak at St Peter’s Campus tomorrow as part of WW1 conference

uoslibmedia:

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Kate Adie OBE, one of the country’s award-winning journalists will give a free lecture tomorrow April 5th 1.30pm at the Sir Tom Cowie Lecture Theatre at St Peter’s Campus as part of the conference: ‘First World War and it’s Global Legacies: 100 years on' Saturday, April 5th and Sunday April 6th, 2014. Full conference tickets are available here.

Kate will discuss the legacy of women in the First World War and will sign copies of her book, Fighting on the Home Front: The Legacy of Women in World War One. The audience will also have a chance to quiz her on her work and experience as part of a Q&A session.

Kate is an Honorary Professor of Journalism at the University, as well as holding an Honorary Fellowship. She grew up in Sunderland, and began her career as a journalist at BBC Radio Durham.

During her career she reported from some of the most dangerous places in the world; beginning with the London Iranian Embassy siege in 1980, reporting unscripted and live to one of the largest news audiences in history.

She went on to report on the American bombing of Tripoli in 1986 and the Lockerbie bombing of 1988. She was promoted to Chief News Correspondent in 1989 and held the role for fourteen years. One of her first assignments was to report the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989. Over the next two decades she reported from the Gulf War, the 1994 Rwandan Genocide and the war in Sierra Leone in 2000.

In 2003 Kate withdrew from front-line reporting, and currently works as a freelance journalist, public speaker, and presents From Our Own Correspondent on BBC Radio 4. Kate Adie was awarded an OBE in 1993 and won the Richard Dimbleby Award from BAFTA in 1990.

The University of Sunderland library is proud to hold the Kate Adie Collection as part of it’s Special Collections and archives which is held at the Murray Library. Researchers, students and staff are welcome to research Kate’s work using the library’s collections. A number of Kate Adie’s most famous broadcasts are available to watch online direct from our archive collections. Please explore our online archive catalogue or contact our archivists or ask any member of library staff for more information. We also have a number of resources available to borrow from within our main collection.

This talk is free of charge and available to all. Tickets can be obtained here.

Culture Collisions: Troubling Images - Researching Northern Ireland with University of Sunderland Library resources

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This is a guest blog post for the Culture Collisions series by our Art and Culture librarians on the theme of propaganda showcasing resources from across the library collection. The range below can be used to research the conflict in Northern Ireland from a variety of perspectives.

Chronicle - BBC Northern Ireland - to access go to: Discover A-Z and browse our list of Resources until you see BBC Northern Ireland.

The audio-visual archives of the BBC contain a wealth of material gathered since it was founded in the 1920’s but it remains largely inaccessible, held on film or videotape and indexed to serve the needs of programme-makers within the BBC.

The Chronicle project contains material digitally transferred from the BBC NI news archive between 1963-1975 and provides Authenticated Users with access to digitised copies of news and current affairs material covering Northern Ireland and The Troubles, along with web-based tools allowing it to be searched, viewed and annotated.

Any notable events or broadcasts missing from this period have either not yet been digitised or are absent from the original film collection, or may not have been recorded by BBC NI at the time. Here are some examples of key events in the Northern Ireland Conflict contained in the resource:

'Bloody Sunday' (30 January 1972); the scene below shows Queens students walking from University to Tyrone House, Malone Road in the aftermath of Bloody Sunday.

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Derry March (5 October 1968); the footage below shot from within the crowd at times shows Police dispersing the Civil Rights March using batons.

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BFI Screen Online  This website provides a guide to Britain’s film and TV history which features hundreds of hours of film and TV clips from the BFI’s National Archive. It contains some useful commentary on the Northern Ireland conflict. To access it just go to Discover A-Z and browse our list of Resources . It is available on campus to all members of University of Sunderland.

See it’s section on ‘Ireland and the Troubles' in the War and Conflict section particularly the documentary series 'Ireland: A Television History (1980-81)’:

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The Kate Adie Collection

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The Special Collections in Murray Library at University of Sunderland hold the Kate Adie archive which has some highlights of Kate’s reporting on the conflict. Some of these have been digitised and are available to watch online.

Kate Adie reports on the bombing of Ulster Defence Regiment Barracks (UDR) in Belfast. Running time 1 minute and 5 seconds. 06/06/1979

Kate Adie reports on an IRA bombing of RAF Uxbridge. Includes interviews. Running time 2 minutes and 59 seconds. 09/01/1981

There are many further resources exploring or depicting Northern Ireland and cinema in our library catalogue:

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Hill, John (2006) Cinema and Northern Ireland: film, culture and politics, London : BFI

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McGarry, John; O’Leary, Brendan (1995) Explaining Northern Ireland: broken images, Oxford : Blackwell

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McQueen, Steve (2008) Hunger, Pathe (DVD)

(Source: uoslibmedia)

Culture Collisions: Can you trust a photograph?

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In the culture of digital photography we are used to images being manipulated. With airbrushed celebrities, Photoshop, Instagram and common apps on your phone for easy image editing. However, how often do we actually question the reality of a photograph? Photography is commonly thought of as a documentary medium, capturing events and everyday life as it happens, but from its earliest beginnings, the photographic image has been subject to manipulation. Can we really trust photographs as evidential resources?

There is an argument that all photographs are manipulated in some way, from staging the composition to processing techniques, before we even start thinking about after effects. Photographs are always likely to involve an element of illusion. When thinking about the truth of the photographic image Fineman, M. (2012) Faking it: manipulated photography before Photoshopis an essential resource that

shows photography to be an inspired blend of fabricated truths and artful falsehoods

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It maps the fakery of photographs, including well known examples like the Cottingley Fairies.

From a theory point of view, Sontag On Photography is a must read.

Thinking back to the Culture Collisions last week, photography can be propagandist, used to portray a particular vision of life, which is another form of manipulation. Have a look at something like Propaganda & dreams: photographing the 1930s in the USSR and the US and you will quickly see how the composition and subject of an image can used to portray a particular ideology.

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When using photographs as a primary source you will need to consider the integrity, context and content of your image.

Culture Collisions: War Photography

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"Prior to the invention of the camera, a visual understanding of what war looked like was hard to come by." Brewer, P. (2005) War in Focus. London: Carlton Books. p.7

Brewer’s introduction nicely summarises the difficulty of the outside observer to understand the experience of war, outlining how literary and visual representations before the photograph, failed to capture the realities of war.

War photography is often tragic and harrowing and is a rich primary source for students of history, politics, arts or culture more widely. In the Murray Library, browsing the shelves at 778.907 will open up a world of photographic primary sources which are a great resource to use in your research.

In this section you will find my favourite library purchase of the past year. WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflicts and its Aftermath

War/photography: images of armed conflict and its aftermath

It is a beautiful (and very heavy!) catalogue that includes more than 480 images depicting the facets of war from the Crimean and American Civil Wars to Iraq and 9/11.

Coincidentally, while thinking about this blog post, I came across a programme that was shown on BBC4 last night Which Way is the Front Line from Here? The Life and Time of Tim Hetherington  A documentary about the war photographer Tim Hetherington that will be well worth watching.

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Here’s a few of the highlights from our collection to consider when thinking about primary sources for war and conflict.